Quite some time ago, your engineering team started working on a project, and it’s still not finished several months later. You have no idea when the the team is going to deliver, and it’s possible that you don’t even know exactly what they are going to deliver. Periodically you ask them for a “status update,” and maybe they give you an estimated timeline, but it seems like the promised date continues to slip more and more no matter how much you badger them.

A lot of us have been in this situation at some point, and it isn’t a great…


Last week, OnlyFans announced they would boot all porn off of their platform as of October 1, which predictably started an uproar on the Internet. For those not familiar with OnlyFans, it is a platform that allows content creators to sell content directly to their fans and to virtually engage with them. In practical terms, this means that it is mostly a marketplace for homemade porn. However, the site has gained some mainstream usage over the Covid pandemic, including mainstream celebrities (e.g. Cardi B and Tyga), chefs, and yoga instructors.

Payment providers vs Adult Content

After OnlyFans announced they would ban pornography, there were many…


Death is a tricky thing to think about. On one level, I know objectively that some day I will die. I have done a lot of Buddhist meditation, and am familiar with the teaching that we all will grow old and die. Even though I’m an optimist about technology, I don’t believe we will “solve” death. Maybe we will figure out how to live a little bit longer, but we aren’t going to be living for 1,000 years any time soon. Still, even though I accept the surface-level facts about death, I still can’t quite wrap my head around it.


The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently released the final draft of their latest report, so I decided to take a look at it. Their conclusion: we are most definitely seeing the effects of climate change, and these effects will continue to worsen. If we do manage to make major reductions in our CO2 output, we can mitigate some of the worst results, but some of the most troubling changes are more-or-less permanent and can’t be easily reversed through a few years of austerity.

I know that’s probably not shocking to most of us, but hopefully it will serve as…


This week I finished reading two very different books; Limits to Growth¹ by Donella Meadows at al and The Beginning of Infinity² by David Deutsch. Initially I thought there was no connection between the two books, as I started reading them at different times and under completely different circumstances. However, upon finishing both within the same week, I realized that there are quite a few parallels; the Beginning of Infinity covers the nature of human progress while Limits to Growth covers potential limits to it. As such, I had an opportunity to reflect on the message presented by each book.

Have we already passed our limits?


Some time ago, I came across User Story Mapping by Jeff Patton while looking for books about customer discovery. So I ordered a copy, and while it wasn’t exactly a light read, I finally made it all the way through and figured I would share some of what I learned. The topic of user stories is particularly relevant because Agile just turned 20 this year, and has been declared a failed experiment by at least one person. …


It seems like every time Bitcoin crashes down from a new height, some people predict that the “bitcoin bubble” is over, while simultaneously there is a chorus of people saying HODL (crypto geek speak for “hold”). These veterans show a familiar chart of Bitcoin’s price history; each crash looks catastrophic as it happens, but when you look at the long-term trend, that large drop is nearly drowned out by further upward movement.

However, I am hoping that the recent drop from $60K to $30K is part of a more permanent trend where Bitcoin crashes back to a much lower level…


Maybe you would rather drive this than your current ride?

In the past, the devices we used were a lot simpler, and we expected to know how they worked. For example, people used to service and repair their own cars before they became loaded with onboard computers. When I was a kid, my grandfather had a collection of vintage cars that he would keep running in his spare time. He would complain about how finicky some of them were, but they pretty much all ran, and he was by no means a professional mechanic.

To give an example of how things differed 100 years ago from what we have today…


In the past couple of days, I have seen a bunch of headlines claiming things like MIT Predicted in 1972 That Society Will Collapse This Century. New Research Shows We’re on Schedule.¹ or New study confirms we’re right on time for a complete societal collapse.² As someone who likes to look beneath the surface on pop science articles, I have found that it is possible to learn a lot by looking past the sensationalism and reading the original paper.

It turns out that these headlines aren’t in response to the original 1972 report, which became a bestselling book called Limits…


Recently I’ve been talking to a bunch of people who are starting companies, typically engineers who are going out on their own for the first time. And I’ve seen a bunch of patterns in the sorts of mistakes they make in coming up with ideas and doing research for their new companies. So I’m going to catalog some of the most common ones I’ve seen.

Mistake 1: I’m the user

On the surface, this one isn’t so bad. After all, the most common place to find problems is by starting with problems that you have yourself. In many cases, these are problems that you have…

Dana Levine

Hacker, PM, and 3x Entrepreneur. Currently doing product consulting and coaching.

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